Combi-Camp Modifications

Photos of my modifications and improvements made to a

Combi-Camp Koala by Howard Golton

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See also my Cooker Windshield modifications

Electrical Installation

These photos show my 240v electrical installation. They may help you do your own. If so you must pay particular attention to the need to earth the chassis and other surfaces of the trailer unit. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT!! In my case I have made a special earth terminal to the kitchen unit and also run additional earthing cables to the kitchen stove. After I completed the installation I checked earth continuity from test points on the steel chassis to the 240v supply system. If you have any questions you can email me at

This shows the side of the Koala kitchen unit after the fitting with a standard 240v mains inlet. The Koala normally comes with the required hole already cut and covered with a riveted blanking plate. It is simple to drill out the rivets and fit a normal caravan 240v inlet. It is just the correct size!

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The Koala has a slim upright storage cupboard on the left. Here this has been converted into an electrical cupboard with a fitted removable door made from plywood and secured with magnetic catches. Sealant has also been used together with varnish to ensure a weatherproof sealed enclosure.

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The door is easily removed and can be stored flat inside the cupboard when not needed. There is room inside for a travel kettle and other cables. On the left hand side of the cupboard you can see a 4-way 240v socket strip. One socket is used to provide power to the fridge and another is used to feed power through to the main tent unit. This then leaves another 2 free for a kettle and other equipment.

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Inside the cabinet the walls are lined with varnished plywood. This allows easy mounting of electrical sockets and the RCD protected mains consumer unit (10A). The floor is also plywood and contains the 12v socket for the fridge. Power for the fridge is fed from the 240v socket through a connector and then through the hole in the right hand panel to the fridge unit.

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The floor is made so that is can lift up at the front. This provides access to the area underneath that can be used for additional storage. It can also be used for storage of valuables that you want to keep out of sight.

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This is the view underneath the plywood floor. This shows the 240v mains inlet. The power cable (red) loops downwards and then goes up at the back into the mains consumer unit above. Also visible at the back is the yellow/green earth wiring that runs down from the consumer unit to a special earth point below the mains inlet. The stove is also earthed.

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To provide power into the main tent unit an extension cable runs out from the access hole in the back of the kitchen unit. To prevent rain water from entering into the kitchen unit the cable is arranged so that it loops downwards and then up again. Also the access hole is blocked by a shaped piece of wood cut to allow the cable to pass through.

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This is a close up of the access hole. Sorry that I forgot to clean the unit before taking this photo! You can see here that the hole is further protected by the wooden blanking piece. This has a small notch cut to allow the cable to pass through. A different piece of wood is used to protect against rainwater during transit. It is held in place by a further piece of wood shown in later photos below.

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During travel when water is most likely to splash against the kitchen the cable access hole is protected by a special wooden 'bung' that is a tight fit into the hole. This is difficult to see in this photo but the 'bung' is shown below too. 

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This photo shows the bung used to seal the cable opening during transit. It has a section shaped to fit through the hole. This is further sealed with a rubber strip around it. The bung is held in place by a locking piece pushed against it from inside the electrical cabinet. This is shown in the photo below. 

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This is the locking piece made of wood with a small handle. This goes at the back of the cabinet and then is slid sideways locking the bung and this piece of wood into the metal framework of the kitchen unit. 

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The extension cable runs around the back of the kitchen unit and then enters the main tent unit where the hinge is. Here you can see the canvas flap held back to show the channel. After the trailer unit is erected the cable is passed along this channel and down into the tent. By unzipping the door at this point the cable and extension block can be passed easily into the tent.  

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Here you can see the other end of the cable in the main living area by the door. The type of extension that I used comes with a removable mounting connector that is screwed to a small piece of plywood. This in turn is glued to the trailer metal panel. It is a simple task then to just 'click' the connector block into place.

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This is the end result. The cable is again allowed to loop downwards in case any water should run down it (it never has!) This provides a convenient position from which heaters and lighting can be run. 

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One of the main uses of the electrical system is to provide heating. Here a small fan heater is used to give good heating. The main connector strip is now hidden behind the canvas flap of the seating cushion. 

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 Collapsible baskets are an easy way to provide structured storage space inside the tent!

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 See also my Cooker Windshield modifications

 

 

 

 

 

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©  Howard Golton 2003 - Page last updated: 6th November 2003.